Time for a new Experience?

The Kosher Food and Wine Experience (KFWE) is an evening of (supposedly fancy) food and wine, organized every year around February by Kedem Europe. It takes place in central London but also has sister events in Paris and in various venues in the United States. I’ve been going to this event for about six years, and I regret to say that not much has changed since I first attended in 2011. Or, rather, not enough has changed. To be fair, there have been a few developments. One, they’ve started doing tasting workshops, which is a much-needed gap-filler. Jews need to be educated about wine, and equally, non-Jews need to be educated about kosher wine. While I have some misgivings about the quality of these workshops, I’m pleased they are happening and I wish they were available all year round.

The foodie attitude is now tangibly present within the Jewish community, and I don’t only mean the modern segments but also the more right-wing groups (haredim, or the strictly Orthodox). Many haredim apparently have the money a) to attend this rather pricy event – tickets go at £50 each – and b) to buy more expensive stuff than the standard kiddush wine. The foodie approach is, however, limited for now to externalities. If it’s a trendy caterer, that’s cool, and if they serve sushi, that’s ‘in’. They’ve served sushi for the past six years. I say, it’s time to move on and try something different.

As for the wines, the selection has been expanding. My favourite part of the event is going around to see who is new. I skip the big shots, e.g. Herzog or Carmel or Binyamina, and look for the unknown names. This year I’ve discovered a handsome Italian winery called Cantina Giuliano, run by a young couple in Tuscany.

Their wines are still young and so are they, which means they haven’t got tremendous experience, but they are a nice addition to the international kosher wine palette. And it’s always heart-warming to see a small family winery (and Jewish too!) spring up in such a historic wine region. Their grapes are the traditional local ones, for instance Vermentino, Sangiovese, and Ciliegiolo; and their winemaking also reflects local tradition.
If you visit their website you’ll see that Giuliano is a well thought-out business with a clear sense of purpose. Their selection of wines is small, which could reflect a traditional outlook on winemaking: stick to grapes and styles that are local, or it could be down to the fact that they’re still growing. Giuliano also offer locally produced food in their restaurant, wine tours, and kosher accommodation.

I’ve tasted their full current range: a white Costa Toscana IGT made from Vermentino grapes, with a fantastic, rich bouquet, floral and fruity flavours and upright acidity. Primizia is their DOCG Chianti, which was aged only in the traditional tonno vat. The 2014 vintage is fresh and fruity with a hint of smokiness. The 2015 vintage has a completely different character: it is very perfumed and soft. Their Costa Toscana IGT red, called Gioia, is an enjoyable blend of fruitiness and ageing. A winery to look out for – and to visit when you’re in Tuscany!

matar-chardonnay-2014-w-26Matar, an Israeli brand, was my other favourite discovery this year. Matar is the kosher range of Pelter, a well-known winery who otherwise produce non-kosher wines. Their wines are spot on, made to a very high standard. I tasted their Cumulus 2013, a red blend with the sort of nose I love: spicy and peppery, with a prickly green, nettle character. On the palate it was soft yet savoury, friendly and interesting. The Matar CB is a red Bordeaux blend; the 2013 is rich, soft, fruity and chocolatey, with warming alcohol. This year they’ve also come out with a Chardonnay, produced in 2014, under the name Admon. The wine has a very restrained nose, which contrasts with a quite intense palate. The lees and oak influence are obvious, but it’s all pretty, with a very toasty tasty finish.

To come back to KFWE: despite my usual annual disappointment that their buffet menu is still heavily centred on carvery and sushi, this year I’ve come away feeling it was a worthwhile visit. I’ve discovered interesting new wines and retasted some superb classics. All in all, this tasting event is a great idea and I’m glad it’s becoming ever more popular, including among the more strictly Orthodox. But if it were infused with a bit more creativity, it would have even more potential.

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